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MASTERY2018-02-22T23:54:08+00:00

“We speak, but it is God who teaches.” St. Augustine of Hippo

GREYSCALE COLORING IS A PROCESS THAT UNFOLDS DIFFERENTLY FOR EACH COLORIST.  THE KEY TO GETTING STARTED IS TO BEGIN WITH LIGHT COLORS AND LITE HAND PRESSURE. WORK IN LAYERS, WITH EACH HAVING INCREASED BRILLIANCE AND BOLDNESS.  LET THE HOLY SPIRIT GUIDE YOUR HANDS AS YOU MEDITATE ON EACH IMAGE and select each color.  USE THE SIMPLE RUBRICAT STEPS AS A BASELINE TO BEGIN, BUT DO NOT LET THEM LIMIT YOUR CREATIVITY AND COMFORTABILITY.  IT SHOULD take time. It need not be finished in one coloring session, rather, it is a mystery to unfold and upon completion, one is filled with accomplishment.  USE THE SAMPLE VIDEOS BELOW TO ASSIST YOU IN THE COLORING PROCESS FROM START TO FINISH.

SELECTING

Select your image. Choose a color palette for the area of the image you would like to start with.

LAYERING

Start with three light to medium colors on the light grey areas. Use light hand pressure.

SHADOWING

Preserve white areas with white, shade shadows with darker colors, and finish with outlining.

BLENDING

In a circular motion, use a blender tool or a white pencil to burnish and co-mingle colors.

FINISHING

Using sharpened light pencils, show highlights or sheen with quick medium pressure strokes.

ChrómaCat Mastery: The Crucifixion – Image 13

As you begin an image with numerous elements, concentrate on one object at a time, light colors first, such as the skin.  Select a base color and flood the area VERY lightly as your first layer.  As you move to darker areas, again, start with a base layer that is light, allowing you to see the grey shading below.  At that point you can initially increase your hand pressure over each darker grey area with the same color.  As you move from element to element, illuminating the details, note the expressions and positioning of the figures and objects.  In this image, note the angels facial expressions, one of joy and one of disbelief.

ChrómaCat Mastery: The Pieta – Image 14

Starting by flooding the lighter areas of Jesus’ body and Mary’s face with color help to define their boundaries. Then applying more pressure to the dark grey areas with additional layers brings out the depth and shading.  The same process can be used for each additional area you are illuminating.  Each additional layer blends in new color and contrast, with the darkest tones used sparingly to highlight features in the foreground from the background.